Museum logo

Items with Images Only

Search Hints: To search by phrase wrap your criteria in quotes. ex: "Find me"

634 results found. Records searched: 634

Image of Graphic - Orr traveled extensively throughout North Carolina to view potential subjects, and he consulted informed citizens on that point. The subjects were finally chosen with Humber's aid and in 1939 Orr began the labor that was to be his first principal concern until 1951. He procedure was to visit each site, viewing it at various times of day so as to choose the fall of the light best for his purpose. Then he returned at that best time to make detailed pencil drawings of the subject. It embraces the architectural slendor of North Carolina in all of its phases, which have been neglected and underestimated through the years. Our state possesses  some of the most outstanding architectural monuments in America and Mr. Orr authenticated their credientials with the transcendency of his genius. He is a draftsman of impeccable fidelity to the minutiae of detail, recording even the slightest deviation in the angles of roofs, the exact number of sawteeth in a pediment and the elaborate ornamentation of a cornice. He is a master of luminosity, pursing lights and shadows down fluted columns, under the eaves of buildings and around the subtle edges of shrubbery and leaves. His treatment of light often displays, like a mirror, the reflected characteristics of its surroundings, as may be see in the etching of the Playmakers Theater at Chapel Hill. He also possesses an unrivaled technique for interpreting textuture, which it be wood, brick or stone, especially the mellowed patina that comes with ageless beauty. It maye be said that Mr. Orr does not make a drawing of a building but a protrait and endows it with personality and enduring life. The fifty subjects which Mr. Orr etched on North Carolina not only compromise the most important work ever executed in the history of our nation on any State of the Union, but it is also a landmark of artistic genius, portraying the disciplined excellence of our taste in architecture, the refinement of our social life and the cultural heritage of our people.

Graphic - Orr traveled extensively throughout North Carolina to view potential subjects, and he consulted informed citizens on that point. The subjects were finally chosen with Humber's aid and in 1939 Orr began the labor that was to be his first principal concern until 1951. He procedure was to visit each site, viewing it at various times of day so as to choose the fall of the light best for his purpose. Then he returned at that best time to make detailed pencil drawings of the subject. It embraces the architectural slendor of North Carolina in all of its phases, which have been neglected and underestimated through the years. Our state possesses some of the most outstanding architectural monuments in America and Mr. Orr authenticated their credientials with the transcendency of his genius. He is a draftsman of impeccable fidelity to the minutiae of detail, recording even the slightest deviation in the angles of roofs, the exact number of sawteeth in a pediment and the elaborate ornamentation of a cornice. He is a master of luminosity, pursing lights and shadows down fluted columns, under the eaves of buildings and around the subtle edges of shrubbery and leaves. His treatment of light often displays, like a mirror, the reflected characteristics of its surroundings, as may be see in the etching of the Playmakers Theater at Chapel Hill. He also possesses an unrivaled technique for interpreting textuture, which it be wood, brick or stone, especially the mellowed patina that comes with ageless beauty. It maye be said that Mr. Orr does not make a drawing of a building but a protrait and endows it with personality and enduring life. The fifty subjects which Mr. Orr etched on North Carolina not only compromise the most important work ever executed in the history of our nation on any State of the Union, but it is also a landmark of artistic genius, portraying the disciplined excellence of our taste in architecture, the refinement of our social life and the cultural heritage of our people.

Object Type: Object

Image of Ceramic - Maria Montoya Martinez  (1886-1980), the Best known American Indian potter who lived and worked at San Ildefonso Pueblo in Northern New Mexico, revived the traditional methods of pottery making and combined the ancient style with her innovations in design. This blackware bowl was formed by hand (not on a potter's wheel) using the "coil method." Traditional Pueblo pottery is hardened in the relatively low heat of a wood fire. The bonfire is then covered with sheets of metal and dired cow manure. The fire burns 2 hours reaching a peak temperature of 1400 F. Maria's husband, Julian, pioneered a reduction process in which oxygen is excluded during the firing process by smothering the fire at its peak temperature with dired, powered horse manuare and woodash. This process causes the pots to blacken by depostion of carbon and produces pottery similiar to the ancient pueblo Indian polished black pottery of which only shards survive today. Julian experiemented for nearly a decade with techniques for decorating the blackware which Maria has learned by Long practive to polish to high luster using pebbles and fire to an ever-deeper black. In 1918, Julian perfected a paint made of fine refractory clay that would fire to a dull matte black while the pot itself retained its lustrous black polish. The black pottery made by the Martinez familiy revived what was a dying utilitarian craft and became an artform. After Julian's death in 1943, Maria collaborated with her daughter-in-law, Santana, and her grandson, Tony Da, and great-granddaughter, Barbara Gonzales, until her death on July 21, 1980, at the age of 94. Her descendents continue the Martinez family blackware pottery which traces its lineage back to 1300 A.D. The pottery is hand-formed and decorated using either the polishing method devised by Maria or the painting method invented by Julian or a combination of both.

Ceramic - Maria Montoya Martinez (1886-1980), the Best known American Indian potter who lived and worked at San Ildefonso Pueblo in Northern New Mexico, revived the traditional methods of pottery making and combined the ancient style with her innovations in design. This blackware bowl was formed by hand (not on a potter's wheel) using the "coil method." Traditional Pueblo pottery is hardened in the relatively low heat of a wood fire. The bonfire is then covered with sheets of metal and dired cow manure. The fire burns 2 hours reaching a peak temperature of 1400 F. Maria's husband, Julian, pioneered a reduction process in which oxygen is excluded during the firing process by smothering the fire at its peak temperature with dired, powered horse manuare and woodash. This process causes the pots to blacken by depostion of carbon and produces pottery similiar to the ancient pueblo Indian polished black pottery of which only shards survive today. Julian experiemented for nearly a decade with techniques for decorating the blackware which Maria has learned by Long practive to polish to high luster using pebbles and fire to an ever-deeper black. In 1918, Julian perfected a paint made of fine refractory clay that would fire to a dull matte black while the pot itself retained its lustrous black polish. The black pottery made by the Martinez familiy revived what was a dying utilitarian craft and became an artform. After Julian's death in 1943, Maria collaborated with her daughter-in-law, Santana, and her grandson, Tony Da, and great-granddaughter, Barbara Gonzales, until her death on July 21, 1980, at the age of 94. Her descendents continue the Martinez family blackware pottery which traces its lineage back to 1300 A.D. The pottery is hand-formed and decorated using either the polishing method devised by Maria or the painting method invented by Julian or a combination of both.

Object Type: Object

Image of Graphic

Graphic

Object Type: Object

Image of Graphic

Graphic

Object Type: Object

Image of Graphic

Graphic

Object Type: Object

Image of Ceramic

Ceramic

Object Type: Object

Image of Ceramic

Ceramic

Object Type: Object

Image of Sculpture

Sculpture

Object Type: Object

Image of Painting

Painting

Object Type: Object