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Image of Ceramic

Ceramic

Object Type: Object

Image of Ceramic

Ceramic

Object Type: Object

Image of Painting - Mrs. Jessamine Shumate is perhaps the only local artist to use a burned cookie sheet and a blowtorch to do some of her painting. She used her blowtorch to put a wax coat on the many different "collages" that she does, and the blisters on a burned cookie sheet served as the pattern for one of her favorite abstract paitings. An extremely versatile artist, she does still lifes, drip paintings, historical maps, silk screen prints, decorative panels and metal sculpturing as well as "collages" and abstracts. A retired teacher in the Henry County School System. Mrs. Shumate began painting 20 years ago as a hobby. Her interest in art grew following her graduation from Martinsville High School. She studied art at Averett College, Lynchburg College, the University of North Carolina Women's College and the New York Students League. She considers herself a "colorist" because her "love of color and design"  inspires many of her paintings. Mrs. Shumate does most of her paintings in pastels, olis and water colors. Although she admits that many of her paintings are realistic, she cites abstracts and still lifes as her favorite types of painting because the yallow the artistmore freedom of self expression. Shortly after her retirement Mrs. Shumate painted historical maps of Guilford County and Pitt County, both in North Carolina, and Henry County in the state of Virginia. The maps which often required as much as two years of research, contain miniature reproductions of old home sites, county and state  flags and many other sites of historical importance.

Painting - Mrs. Jessamine Shumate is perhaps the only local artist to use a burned cookie sheet and a blowtorch to do some of her painting. She used her blowtorch to put a wax coat on the many different "collages" that she does, and the blisters on a burned cookie sheet served as the pattern for one of her favorite abstract paitings. An extremely versatile artist, she does still lifes, drip paintings, historical maps, silk screen prints, decorative panels and metal sculpturing as well as "collages" and abstracts. A retired teacher in the Henry County School System. Mrs. Shumate began painting 20 years ago as a hobby. Her interest in art grew following her graduation from Martinsville High School. She studied art at Averett College, Lynchburg College, the University of North Carolina Women's College and the New York Students League. She considers herself a "colorist" because her "love of color and design" inspires many of her paintings. Mrs. Shumate does most of her paintings in pastels, olis and water colors. Although she admits that many of her paintings are realistic, she cites abstracts and still lifes as her favorite types of painting because the yallow the artistmore freedom of self expression. Shortly after her retirement Mrs. Shumate painted historical maps of Guilford County and Pitt County, both in North Carolina, and Henry County in the state of Virginia. The maps which often required as much as two years of research, contain miniature reproductions of old home sites, county and state flags and many other sites of historical importance.

Object Type: Object

Image of Ceramic

Ceramic

Object Type: Object

Image of Ceramic

Ceramic

Object Type: Object

Image of Graphic - Orr traveled extensively throughout North Carolina to view potential subjects, and he consulted informed citizens on that point. The subjects were finally chosen with Humber's aid and in 1939 Orr began the labor that was to be his first principal concern until 1951. He procedure was to visit each site, viewing it at various times of day so as to choose the fall of the light best for his purpose. Then he returned at that best time to make detailed pencil drawings of the subject. It embraces the architectural slendor of North Carolina in all of its phases, which have been neglected and underestimated through the years. Our state possesses  some of the most outstanding architectural monuments in America and Mr. Orr authenticated their credientials with the transcendency of his genius. He is a draftsman of impeccable fidelity to the minutiae of detail, recording even the slightest deviation in the angles of roofs, the exact number of sawteeth in a pediment and the elaborate ornamentation of a cornice. He is a master of luminosity, pursing lights and shadows down fluted columns, under the eaves of buildings and around the subtle edges of shrubbery and leaves. His treatment of light often displays, like a mirror, the reflected characteristics of its surroundings, as may be see in the etching of the Playmakers Theater at Chapel Hill. He also possesses an unrivaled technique for interpreting textuture, which it be wood, brick or stone, especially the mellowed patina that comes with ageless beauty. It maye be said that Mr. Orr does not make a drawing of a building but a protrait and endows it with personality and enduring life. The fifty subjects which Mr. Orr etched on North Carolina not only compromise the most important work ever executed in the history of our nation on any State of the Union, but it is also a landmark of artistic genius, portraying the disciplined excellence of our taste in architecture, the refinement of our social life and the cultural heritage of our people.

Graphic - Orr traveled extensively throughout North Carolina to view potential subjects, and he consulted informed citizens on that point. The subjects were finally chosen with Humber's aid and in 1939 Orr began the labor that was to be his first principal concern until 1951. He procedure was to visit each site, viewing it at various times of day so as to choose the fall of the light best for his purpose. Then he returned at that best time to make detailed pencil drawings of the subject. It embraces the architectural slendor of North Carolina in all of its phases, which have been neglected and underestimated through the years. Our state possesses some of the most outstanding architectural monuments in America and Mr. Orr authenticated their credientials with the transcendency of his genius. He is a draftsman of impeccable fidelity to the minutiae of detail, recording even the slightest deviation in the angles of roofs, the exact number of sawteeth in a pediment and the elaborate ornamentation of a cornice. He is a master of luminosity, pursing lights and shadows down fluted columns, under the eaves of buildings and around the subtle edges of shrubbery and leaves. His treatment of light often displays, like a mirror, the reflected characteristics of its surroundings, as may be see in the etching of the Playmakers Theater at Chapel Hill. He also possesses an unrivaled technique for interpreting textuture, which it be wood, brick or stone, especially the mellowed patina that comes with ageless beauty. It maye be said that Mr. Orr does not make a drawing of a building but a protrait and endows it with personality and enduring life. The fifty subjects which Mr. Orr etched on North Carolina not only compromise the most important work ever executed in the history of our nation on any State of the Union, but it is also a landmark of artistic genius, portraying the disciplined excellence of our taste in architecture, the refinement of our social life and the cultural heritage of our people.

Object Type: Object

Image of Ceramic

Ceramic

Object Type: Object

Image of Graphic

Graphic

Object Type: Object